Shadowboxing: The Data Shadows of Cold War International Law

Forthcoming, Matthew Craven, Sundhya Pahuja, Gerry Simpson and Anna Saunders (eds), Cold War International Law

UNSW Law Research Paper No. 17-62

28 Pages Posted: 28 Sep 2017

See all articles by Fleur E. Johns

Fleur E. Johns

University of New South Wales, Faculty of Law

Date Written: September 4, 2017

Abstract

That states have come to be represented in “data shadows” for international legal purposes – that is, that state populations’ condition may be gleaned from remotely sensed data to overcome deficiencies in official government statistics – is today identified with digital innovation. “Data shadows” were, however, crucial features of Cold War international law. Cold War decision-makers were captivated by the prognostications and intimations of “sigint” (signals intelligence). International legal order came to be marked, during the Cold War, by the latent or virtual agency of states’ sigint data shadows in ways that leave an enduring legacy today.

Keywords: International law, technology, Cold War, signals intelligence

Suggested Citation

Johns, Fleur E., Shadowboxing: The Data Shadows of Cold War International Law (September 4, 2017). Forthcoming, Matthew Craven, Sundhya Pahuja, Gerry Simpson and Anna Saunders (eds), Cold War International Law ; UNSW Law Research Paper No. 17-62. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3043627 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3043627

Fleur E. Johns (Contact Author)

University of New South Wales, Faculty of Law ( email )

UNSW Australia
Sydney, New South Wales 2052
Australia
+61 2 9385 9893 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.law.unsw.edu.au/profile/fleur-johns

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