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Corporate Masters & Low-Wage Servants: The Social Control of Workers in Poverty

Washington and Lee Civil Rights and Social Justice Journal, Forthcoming

U Denver Legal Studies Research Paper No. 17-31

47 Pages Posted: 3 Oct 2017  

Nantiya Ruan

University of Denver Sturm College of Law

Date Written: October 2, 2017

Abstract

The Article describes and analyzes how the state’s control over low-wage workers has been relegated to private employers. While the state has historically controlled and limited the lives of poor people, today, people in poverty are subjugated through the privatizing of poverty governance by corporate masters who control the lives and shape the behaviors of their low-wage worker servants. The policies of these employers ensures that low-wage work is precarious, unpredictable, and insufficient.

This Article starts an important conversation about how today’s low-wage employers are
corporate masters that control their servants through poverty-level pay and precarious positions. Work is scheduled in a way to make advancement, and the promotional opportunities that go along with it, impossible. Resources, such as leave benefits and support services that would make advancement from hourly entry-level work possible, are lacking. Low-wage employers, like the state in its poverty governance, ensure that their servants are controlled and kept exactly where they want them to be: servicing their masters.

Suggested Citation

Ruan, Nantiya, Corporate Masters & Low-Wage Servants: The Social Control of Workers in Poverty (October 2, 2017). Washington and Lee Civil Rights and Social Justice Journal, Forthcoming; U Denver Legal Studies Research Paper No. 17-31. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3046785

Nantiya Ruan (Contact Author)

University of Denver Sturm College of Law ( email )

2255 E. Evans Avenue
Denver, CO 80208
United States

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