The Role of Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Development: Evidence from Tanzania

100 Pages Posted: 4 Oct 2017 Last revised: 24 Mar 2018

See all articles by Evan S. Lieberman

Evan S. Lieberman

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Department of Political Science

Yang-Yang Zhou

Princeton University, Department of Politics

Date Written: February 20, 2018

Abstract

Do self-efficacy beliefs affect whether citizens engage in development-enhancing behaviors? While scholars have found strong links between self-efficacy and political participation and work efforts in wealthy democracies, much less is known about the role of efficacy in low-income country contexts. In this study, we investigate the relationship between self-efficacy beliefs and citizens’ private and public efforts towards improving the quality of primary school learning in rural Tanzania. First, in a baseline observational study of parent-child dyads, we find a strong relationship between parent self-efficacy beliefs, pro-education parent behaviors, and child test scores. In considering why socioeconomic status (SES) often predicts levels of efficacy, we theorize that high SES individuals have greater opportunities to experience successful episodes of participation. Thus, while SES is difficult to change in the short run, we hypothesize that it may be possible to boost efficacy and pro-development behaviors among poor citizens through exposure to such opportunities. We report the results of a randomized control trial (RCT) of a novel meeting-based intervention - Validated Participation, which affords parents a unique opportunity to discuss evidence, make decisions, and receive validation. We find that this treatment causes a large increase in efficacy among poor parents. We also find suggestive evidence of behavior change in parents reported by teachers.

Keywords: self-efficacy, development, education, experiment, Africa

Suggested Citation

Lieberman, Evan S. and Zhou, Yang-Yang, The Role of Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Development: Evidence from Tanzania (February 20, 2018). MIT Political Science Department Research Paper No. 2018-2. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3047566 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3047566

Evan S. Lieberman

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Department of Political Science ( email )

77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139
United States

Yang-Yang Zhou (Contact Author)

Princeton University, Department of Politics ( email )

Princeton, NJ
United States

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