European Perspectives on Privacy in the Sharing Economy

44 Pages Posted: 6 Oct 2017 Last revised: 24 Nov 2017

See all articles by Giulia Ranzini

Giulia Ranzini

VU University Amsterdam

Michael Etter

Copenhagen Business School

Ivar Vermeulen

VU University Amsterdam

Date Written: October 5, 2017

Abstract

The present report ‘Privacy in the Sharing Economy: European Perspectives’, covers the Privacy part of Ps2share: a European Horizon 2020 Research Project focusing on the sharing economy. Within this document, we present the results of a widespread European survey (N=6111), covering both users and non-users of sharing economy services. The first section of the report provides an overview of the privacy perceptions of users VS non-users of the sharing economy, highlighting important country differences. In the following chapters, we explore in more depth how providers within the platforms (such as Airbnb hosts, or Uber drivers) as well as consumers perceive their privacy, both online and when it comes to face-to-face interaction. In the last section, we explore impression management as a tool to control information disclosure, and the risks sharing economy users perceive from third-party reviews and comments.

Keywords: Privacy, Sharing Economy, Impression Management, Peer Privacy, Institutional Privacy, Attachment, Reviews

Suggested Citation

Ranzini, Giulia and Etter, Michael and Vermeulen, Ivar, European Perspectives on Privacy in the Sharing Economy (October 5, 2017). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3048152 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3048152

Giulia Ranzini (Contact Author)

VU University Amsterdam ( email )

De Boelelaan 1105
Amsterdam, ND North Holland 1081 HV
Netherlands

Michael Etter

Copenhagen Business School ( email )

Ivar Vermeulen

VU University Amsterdam ( email )

De Boelelaan 1105
Amsterdam, ND North Holland 1081 HV
Netherlands

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
118
Abstract Views
1,612
Rank
352,353
PlumX Metrics