Trade in Goods and Factors with International Differences in Technology

30 Pages Posted: 5 Jul 2004 Last revised: 7 Jul 2010

See all articles by James R. Markusen

James R. Markusen

University of Colorado at Boulder - Department of Economics; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Lars E. O. Svensson

Stockholm School of Economics; Stockholm University - Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Date Written: March 1983

Abstract

A general model of trade caused by international differences in production technology is developed using techniques of duality theory. For the caseof product-augmenting differences in technology, it is shown that there is a positive correlation between net export and technological superiority, such that a country will "on average" export goods for which the country has superior technolor. If some factors are permitted to be internationally traded, it is demonstrated via this correlation that the volume of trade must increase. Thus unlike trade caused by factor endowment differences, goods trade caused by product-augmenting differences in production technolody is always in this sense complementary with factor trade. For factor-augmenting technology differences, in the absence of factor trade the goods trade pattern is as if it was caused by factor endowment differences. With factor trade, goods trade and factor trade can then be either complements or substitutes.

Suggested Citation

Markusen, James R. and Svensson, Lars E.O., Trade in Goods and Factors with International Differences in Technology (March 1983). NBER Working Paper No. w1101. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=304825

James R. Markusen (Contact Author)

University of Colorado at Boulder - Department of Economics ( email )

Campus Box 256
Boulder, CO 80309
United States
303-492-0748 (Phone)
303-492-8960 (Fax)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Lars E.O. Svensson

Stockholm School of Economics ( email )

PO Box 6501
Stockholm, 11383
Sweden

HOME PAGE: http://larseosvensson.se

Stockholm University - Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES) ( email )

Stockholm, SE-10691
Sweden

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

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