Achieving Gender Parity on International Judicial and Monitoring Bodies: Analysis of International Human Rights Laws and Standards Relevant to the GQUAL Campaign

IHRLC Working Paper Series No. 4, October 2017

48 Pages Posted: 16 Oct 2017

See all articles by Laurel E. Fletcher

Laurel E. Fletcher

University of California, Berkeley - School of Law

Date Written: October 1, 2017

Abstract

Women are underrepresented in virtually every international body responsible for adjudicating, monitoring, and developing international law. As of February 2017, three of the 15 judges on the International Court of Justice are women; the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea has 21 judges, only one of whom is a woman; and the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia has no permanent women judges. This working paper analyzes the extent to which international human rights law and standards support the GQUAL Campaign’s call for States to pledge to achieve gender parity on international courts and monitoring bodies.

States establish the nominating or voting procedures that apply to any particular international body. There are a number of opportunities for States to shape the pool of applicants, the composition of any short list, and the final composition of the international body. Because States have a fundamental role in establishing the procedures and controlling the final outcome, the GQUAL Campaign calls on States to address underrepresentation by adopting measures to rectify the gender imbalance on international judicial and monitoring bodies.

The Campaign is rooted in well-established and widely accepted provisions of international law. Article 8 of the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women (“CEDAW”) establishes the right of women to represent their governments at the international level, on equal terms with men and without discrimination, and to participate in the work of international organizations. To gain a fuller understanding of the international legal basis for gender parity in addition to the CEDAW framework, this working paper identifies and analyzes complementary international human rights law standards pertinent to the GQUAL Declaration found in the UN Charter, selected international human rights treaties, UN resolutions, and policy statements.

The absence of women in equal numbers with men as international judges and members of human rights monitoring bodies is a grave issue. Gender disparities in international institutions undermine the international commitment to equality and non-discrimination. Further, the lack of gender parity erodes the legitimacy of international legal institutions and their mandates to uphold these universal values. This working paper contributes to the effort to address this gap by drawing attention to the scope of international human rights law and standards that can be marshaled to ground the GQUAL Declaration in international law and accepted best practices.

This working paper was prepared by Mary Dahdouh ’18, Vaitiari Rodriguez Segui ’17, Virginia Smith ’17, and Miguel Zavala Herrera ’18, interns in the International Human Rights Law Clinic (IHRLC), University of California, Berkeley, under the supervision of Laurel E. Fletcher, Clinical Professor of Law and IHRLC Director. María Noel Leoni, Senior Lawyer, Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) and Viviana Krsticevic, CEJIL Executive Director, provided guidance and editorial feedback. Katrina Natale, IHRLC Clinical Teaching Fellow provided valuable research and project support.

Keywords: international law, human rights, women's human rights, international courts

Suggested Citation

Fletcher, Laurel E., Achieving Gender Parity on International Judicial and Monitoring Bodies: Analysis of International Human Rights Laws and Standards Relevant to the GQUAL Campaign (October 1, 2017). IHRLC Working Paper Series No. 4, October 2017, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3052043 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3052043

Laurel E. Fletcher (Contact Author)

University of California, Berkeley - School of Law ( email )

215 Boalt Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720-7200
United States

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