The Changing Culture of Patenting and Its Effects on Research Culture: University Research and Biotechnology

In Steven Howe and Jessica C. Lai (eds), Recht und Kultur (Zürich: Schulthess) 99-116 (2015)

Posted: 16 Oct 2017

See all articles by Jessica C. Lai

Jessica C. Lai

Victoria University of Wellington

Date Written: 2015

Abstract

Before the 1950s, the academic world frowned upon the patenting university research as it was believed that the knowledge produced by universities constituted public goods. However, the broadening of patentable subject matter coupled with changes in academic attitudes has led to universities being major patentees, particularly in the fields of biotechnology and software. This has resulted in complaints that the collegial culture of academia has altered, because academics are no longer willing to share their research with the public or with one another in fear of jeopardising their ability to get patents over that research at a later date. This chapter addresses why there has been a change in the culture of patenting within universities and whether this has indeed transformed their research culture.

Keywords: patent culture, universities, biotechnology

JEL Classification: K11, K33, K39

Suggested Citation

Lai, Jessica C., The Changing Culture of Patenting and Its Effects on Research Culture: University Research and Biotechnology (2015). In Steven Howe and Jessica C. Lai (eds), Recht und Kultur (Zürich: Schulthess) 99-116 (2015), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3053094

Jessica C. Lai (Contact Author)

Victoria University of Wellington ( email )

PO Box 600
Wellington
New Zealand

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