The Relationship between Intellectual Property and Its Physical Embodiments

In Jessica C. Lai and Antoinette Maget Dominicé (eds), Intellectual Property and Access to Im/material Goods (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar) 1-14 (with Antoinette Maget Dominicé). (2016)

Posted: 16 Oct 2017

See all articles by Jessica C. Lai

Jessica C. Lai

Victoria University of Wellington

Date Written: 2016

Abstract

Intellectual property is typically considered to be exclusively incorporeal property since its products (particularly works and inventions) emanate from the mental labour of a creator. What is often forgotten is that even immaterial objects are usually (or arguably have to be) protected and used through a certain materiality, such as on canvas or as a pharmaceutical or trade-marked product. It is nevertheless the case that copyright protects “works” and not their materialisations, patent law protects ideas/inventions and not the physical good embodying them and trade marks protect marks used in trade and not the goods/services on which they are placed. However, despite being intangible in nature, intellectual property has hindered or controlled the access and use of the embodiments of intellectual products. This chapter introduces and illustrates the core issues relating to the relationship between intellectual property and its physical embodiments.

Keywords: intellectual property, embodiment

JEL Classification: K11, K33, K39

Suggested Citation

Lai, Jessica C., The Relationship between Intellectual Property and Its Physical Embodiments (2016). In Jessica C. Lai and Antoinette Maget Dominicé (eds), Intellectual Property and Access to Im/material Goods (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar) 1-14 (with Antoinette Maget Dominicé). (2016) , Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3053095

Jessica C. Lai (Contact Author)

Victoria University of Wellington ( email )

PO Box 600
Wellington
New Zealand

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