Procedural Justice Theory and Public Policy: An Exchange

Posted: 26 Oct 2017

See all articles by John Hagan

John Hagan

Northwestern University - Department of Sociology

Valerie P. Hans

Cornell University - School of Law

Date Written: October 2017

Abstract

This article introduces a scientific exchange over the status of procedural justice theory and its applicability to policing reform. The introduction notes the long history of sociolegal research on procedural justice and its emergence as a source of ideas for criminal justice reforms and police training programs. The article contrasts the positions taken by Nagin & Telep (2017) and Tyler (2017) . Nagin & Telep assert that it is premature to apply procedural justice principles without more definitive causal studies in policing. In contrast, Tyler draws on experimental research and other causal studies from different domains to argue that the work is sufficient to proceed with policy reforms.

Suggested Citation

Hagan, John and Hans, Valerie P., Procedural Justice Theory and Public Policy: An Exchange (October 2017). Annual Review of Law and Social Science, Vol. 13, pp. 1-3, 2017. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3059729 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-lawsocsci-121416-011426

John Hagan (Contact Author)

Northwestern University - Department of Sociology ( email )

1810 Chicago Ave
Evanston, IL 60208
United States

Valerie P. Hans

Cornell University - School of Law ( email )

Myron Taylor Hall
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853-4901
United States
607-255-0095 (Phone)

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