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Is Support for Aid Related to Beliefs About Aid Effectiveness in New Zealand?

32 Pages Posted: 1 Nov 2017  

Camilla Burkot

Australian National University (ANU) - Development Policy Centre

Terence Wood

Australian National University (ANU) - Crawford School of Public Policy

Date Written: November 1, 2017

Abstract

This paper reports on public opinion about aid in New Zealand. It details overall levels of support for aid increases as well as views about the purpose of aid. It also reports in aggregate on New Zealander’s views about aid effectiveness and development progress. The paper examines the correlates of support for increasing aid, as well as correlates of the belief that aid should be given primarily for the purpose of helping other countries. The paper also reports on the correlates of beliefs about aid effectiveness and development progress. Its central findings are as follows. Most New Zealanders are happy with current aid levels. Most also want New Zealand aid given primarily for the purpose of helping poor people in developing countries, rather than advancing New Zealand’s interests. Academic education and left-leaning political views are clearly associated with support for more aid. Religiosity is negatively associated with support for aid increases in most models. Believing that aid is effective is also positively associated with support for aid increases. However, its effect is less than that of political ideology. Older people, people with academic education and people with left-leaning political views are more likely to want aid given to help developing countries, as are people who think aid is effective. Men are considerably less likely to want aid given for altruistic ends.

Keywords: New Zealand, foreign aid, public opinion, aid effectiveness, international development, donor countries

JEL Classification: F35

Suggested Citation

Burkot, Camilla and Wood, Terence, Is Support for Aid Related to Beliefs About Aid Effectiveness in New Zealand? (November 1, 2017). Development Policy Centre Discussion Paper No. 63. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3063065

Camilla Burkot

Australian National University (ANU) - Development Policy Centre ( email )

Building 132, Lennox Crossing
Acton
Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601
Australia

Terence Wood (Contact Author)

Australian National University (ANU) - Crawford School of Public Policy ( email )

7 Liversidge Street
Lennox Crossing
Canberra, Australian Capital Territory ACT 0200
Australia

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