Many Things You Know about Patent Infringement Litigation in China Are Wrong

66 Pages Posted: 6 Nov 2017 Last revised: 11 Nov 2017

Renjun Bian

University of California, Berkeley, School of Law

Date Written: October 1, 2017


As the Chinese government continues to stimulate domestic innovation and patent activities via a variety of policies, China has become a world leader in both patent applications and litigation. These major developments have made China an integral venue of international patent protection for inventors and entrepreneurs worldwide. However, due to the lack of judicial transparency before 2014, westerners had virtually no access to Chinese patent litigation data and knew little about how Chinese courts adjudicated patent cases. Instead, outside observers were left with a variety of impressions and guesses based on the text of Chinese law and the limited number of cases released by the press. Taking advantage of ongoing judicial reform in China, including mandated public access to all judgments made since January 1, 2014 via a database called China Judgements Online (CJO), this paper analyzes 1,663 patent infringement judgments – all publicly available final patent infringement cases decided by local people’s courts in 2014. Surprisingly, many findings in this paper contradict long-standing beliefs held by westerners about patent enforcement in China. One prominent example is that foreign patent holders were as likely to litigate as domestic patent holders, and received noticeably better results – higher win rate, injunction rate, and average damages. Another example is that all plaintiffs won in 80.16% of all patent infringement cases and got permanent injunctions automatically in 90.25% of cases whose courts found patent infringement, indicating stronger patent protection in China than one might expect.

Keywords: Patent Litigation, Empirical Study, China

Suggested Citation

Bian, Renjun, Many Things You Know about Patent Infringement Litigation in China Are Wrong (October 1, 2017). Available at SSRN: or

Renjun Bian (Contact Author)

University of California, Berkeley, School of Law ( email )

Berkeley, CA
United States

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