Eroding Regimes: What, Where, and When?

32 Pages Posted: 9 Nov 2017

See all articles by Michael Coppedge

Michael Coppedge

University of Notre Dame - Kellogg Institute; University of Notre Dame, Department of Political Science

Date Written: November 2017

Abstract

The political world lately seems to be filled with unexpected erosions of democracy. What is the most useful way to describe these phenomena? Do they all belong to a common syndrome? Certainly there are different degrees of erosion, but are there also different types? How common are such erosions in the world today? Is this a new phenomenon, or are there close parallels with events in the past? If we detect early warning signs of erosion, how concerned should we be that it will continue and culminate in the breakdown of democracy? This paper argues that there are two distinct erosion paths. First, there is a classic path of growing repression of speech, media, assembly, and civil liberties, combined with deteriorating political discourse. The second path involves the concentration of power in the executive at the expense of the courts and the legislature, similar to what Guillermo O’Donnell called “delegative democracy,” which entails the erosion of horizontal accountability. Venezuela emerges as the most extreme and most fully articulated instance of erosion along this second path.

Suggested Citation

Coppedge, Michael, Eroding Regimes: What, Where, and When? (November 2017). V-Dem Working Paper 2017:57. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3066677 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3066677

Michael Coppedge (Contact Author)

University of Notre Dame - Kellogg Institute ( email )

Hesburgh Center
Notre Dame, IN 46556
United States

University of Notre Dame, Department of Political Science

216 Hesburgh Center
Notre Dame, IN New South Wales 46556-5646
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.nd.edu/~mcoppedg/crd

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
78
rank
302,793
Abstract Views
231
PlumX Metrics