Occupational Match Quality and Gender Over Two Cohorts

55 Pages Posted: 13 Nov 2017

See all articles by John T. Addison

John T. Addison

University of South Carolina - Moore School of Business - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Liwen Chen

University of South Carolina

Orgul D. Ozturk

University of South Carolina - Moore School of Business - Department of Economics

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Abstract

Job mobility, especially early in a career, is an important source of wage growth. This effect is typically attributed to heterogeneity in the quality of employee-employer matches, with individuals learning of their abilities and discovering the tasks at which they are most productive through job search. That is, job mobility enables better matches, and individuals move to better their labor market prospects and settle once they find a satisfactory match. In this paper, we show that there are gender differences in match quality and changes in match quality over the course of careers. In particular, we find that females are mismatched more than males. This is true even for females with the best early-career matches. However, the direction of the gender effect differs significantly by education. Only females among the college educated are more mismatched and are more likely to be over-qualified then their male counterparts. These results are seemingly driven by life events, such as child birth. For their part, college-educated males of the younger cohort are worse off in terms of match quality compared to the older cohort, while the new generation of women is doing better on average.

Keywords: multidimensional skills, occupational mismatch, match quality, wages, gender wage gap, fertility, fertility timing

JEL Classification: J3, J16, J22, J24, J31, J33, N3

Suggested Citation

Addison, John T. and Chen, Liwen and Ozturk, Orgul D., Occupational Match Quality and Gender Over Two Cohorts. IZA Discussion Paper No. 11114. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3069457

John T. Addison (Contact Author)

University of South Carolina - Moore School of Business - Department of Economics ( email )

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HOME PAGE: http://mooreschool.sc.edu/moore/economics/profiles/addison.htm

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

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Liwen Chen

University of South Carolina ( email )

701 Main Street
Columbia, SC 29208
United States

Orgul D. Ozturk

University of South Carolina - Moore School of Business - Department of Economics ( email )

The Francis M. Hipp Building
1705 College Street
Columbia, SC 29208
United States

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