Older Americans Would Work Longer If Jobs Were Flexible

62 Pages Posted: 13 Nov 2017 Last revised: 26 Nov 2018

See all articles by John Ameriks

John Ameriks

The Vanguard Group, Inc.

Joseph Briggs

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

Andrew Caplin

New York University (NYU) - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Minjoon Lee

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor - Department of Economics

Matthew D. Shapiro

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Christopher Tonetti

Stanford Graduate School of Business

Date Written: November 2017

Abstract

Older Americans, even those who are long retired, have strong willingness to work, especially in jobs with flexible schedules. For many, labor force participation near or after normal retirement age is limited more by a lack of acceptable job opportunities or low expectations about finding them than by unwillingness to work longer. This paper establishes these findings using an approach to identification based on strategic survey questions (SSQs), purpose-designed to complement behavioral data. These findings suggest that demand-side factors are important in explaining late-in-life labor market behavior and need to be considered in designing policies aimed at promoting working longer.

Suggested Citation

Ameriks, John and Briggs, Joseph and Caplin, Andrew and Lee, Minjoon and Shapiro, Matthew D. and Tonetti, Christopher, Older Americans Would Work Longer If Jobs Were Flexible (November 2017). NBER Working Paper No. w24008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3070032

John Ameriks (Contact Author)

The Vanguard Group, Inc. ( email )

P.O. Box 2600
MS V36
Valley Forge, PA 19482-2600
United States
610-503-5676 (Phone)

Joseph Briggs

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

20th Street and Constitution Avenue NW
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Andrew Caplin

New York University (NYU) - Department of Economics ( email )

269 Mercer Street
New York, NY 10003
United States
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212-995-3932 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.econ.nyu.edu/user/caplina/

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Minjoon Lee

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor - Department of Economics ( email )

611 Tappan Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1220
United States

Matthew D. Shapiro

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor - Department of Economics ( email )

and Survey Research Center
611 Tappan Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1220
United States
313-764-5419 (Phone)
313-764-2769 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
313-764-5419 (Phone)
313-764-2769 (Fax)

Christopher Tonetti

Stanford Graduate School of Business ( email )

655 Knight Way
Stanford, CA 94305-5015
United States

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