Hybrid Tribunals as a Viable Transitional Justice Mechanism to Combat Impunity in Post-Conflict Situations

(2006) 22 New Zealand Universities Law Review 213-239 

27 Pages Posted: 21 Nov 2017

See all articles by Alberto Costi

Alberto Costi

Victoria University of Wellington - Faculty of Law

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: 2006

Abstract

Since the end of the 1990s, the international community has increasingly relied on hybrid or mixed tribunals to prosecute international crimes in the aftermath of armed conflict. Hybrid tribunals rely on national laws, judges and prosecutors, contributing to the capacity-building of the local judiciary and the legal system; while also including international standards, personnel, resources, experience and technical knowledge, conferring legitimacy upon them. At the same time, hybrid tribunals pose real problems in their attempt to incorporate different types of law, different levels of expertise and different models of management and funding. The emergence of hybrid tribunals in East Timor, Kosovo, Sierra Leone and Cambodia, and recent moves in Bosnia- Herzegovina and Burundi, are indicative that hybrid tribunals will be central to the development of international criminal law in the coming decades. This paper looks at the emergence of hybrid tribunals, analyses their practice and highlights their possible limitations.

Keywords: International Law, Hybrid Tribunals, UN, Law of Conflict, Justice

JEL Classification: K00, K33

Suggested Citation

Costi, Alberto, Hybrid Tribunals as a Viable Transitional Justice Mechanism to Combat Impunity in Post-Conflict Situations (2006). (2006) 22 New Zealand Universities Law Review 213-239 , Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3074122

Alberto Costi (Contact Author)

Victoria University of Wellington - Faculty of Law ( email )

PO Box 600
Wellington, 6140
New Zealand

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
39
Abstract Views
296
PlumX Metrics