Assessing the Growth of Remote Working and its Consequences for Effort, Well‐Being and Work‐Life Balance

18 Pages Posted: 27 Nov 2017

See all articles by Alan Felstead

Alan Felstead

University of Leicester

Golo Henseke

University College London

Date Written: November 2017

Abstract

This article critically assesses the assumption that more and more work is being detached from place and that this is a ‘win‐win’ for both employers and employees. Based on an analysis of official labour market data, it finds that only one‐third of the increase in remote working can be explained by compositional factors such as movement to the knowledge economy, the growth in flexible employment and organisational responses to the changing demographic make‐up of the employed labour force. This suggests that the detachment of work from place is a growing trend. This article also shows that while remote working is associated with higher organisational commitment, job satisfaction and job‐related well‐being, these benefits come at the cost of work intensification and a greater inability to switch off.

Keywords: remote working, homeworking, teleworking, job quality, work effort, job‐related well‐being, job satisfaction, work‐life balance

Suggested Citation

Felstead, Alan and Henseke, Golo, Assessing the Growth of Remote Working and its Consequences for Effort, Well‐Being and Work‐Life Balance (November 2017). New Technology, Work and Employment, Vol. 32, Issue 3, pp. 195-212, 2017. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3077114 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ntwe.12097

Alan Felstead (Contact Author)

University of Leicester ( email )

Centre for Labour Market Studies
Leicester LE1 7RH
United Kingdom

Golo Henseke

University College London

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