Predicting Violent Behavior: What Can Neuroscience Add?

Posted: 30 Nov 2017 Last revised: 11 Jan 2018

See all articles by Russell A. Poldrack

Russell A. Poldrack

Stanford University - Psychology

John Monahan

University of Virginia School of Law

Peter Imrey

Case Western Reserve University - Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine; Case Western Reserve University - Cleveland Clinic Dept. of Quantitative Health Sciences/JJN3

Valerie F. Reyna

Cornell University

Marcus E. Raichle

Washington University in St. Louis - Department of Neurology; Washington University in St. Louis - Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology; Washington University in St. Louis - Department of Biomedical Engineering; (Formerly Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology

David L. Faigman

University of California Hastings College of the Law

Joshua Buckholtz

Harvard University

Date Written: November 28, 2017

Abstract

The ability to accurately predict violence and other forms of serious antisocial behavior would provide important societal benefits, and there is substantial enthusiasm for the potential predictive accuracy of neuroimaging techniques. Here, we review the current status of violence prediction using actuarial and clinical methods, and assess the current state of neuroprediction. We then outline several questions that need to be addressed by future studies of neuroprediction if neuroimaging and other neuroscientific markers are to be successfully translated into public policy.

Keywords: Risk assessment, violence, crime, neuroscience

Suggested Citation

Poldrack, Russell A. and Monahan, John and Imrey, Peter and Reyna, Valerie F. and Raichle, Marcus E. and Faigman, David L. and Buckholtz, Joshua, Predicting Violent Behavior: What Can Neuroscience Add? (November 28, 2017). Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Forthcoming; Virginia Public Law and Legal Theory Research Paper No. 2017-66; UC Hastings Research Paper No. 260. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3078883

Russell A. Poldrack

Stanford University - Psychology

Stanford, CA 94305
United States

John Monahan (Contact Author)

University of Virginia School of Law ( email )

580 Massie Road
Charlottesville, VA 22903
United States
434-924-3632 (Phone)

Peter Imrey

Case Western Reserve University - Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine ( email )

Cleveland Clinic
9500 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44195
United States
216-444-0923 (Phone)
216-444-8023 (Fax)

Case Western Reserve University - Cleveland Clinic Dept. of Quantitative Health Sciences/JJN3 ( email )

Cleveland Clinic
9500 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44195
United States
216-444-0923 (Phone)
216-444-8023 (Fax)

Valerie F. Reyna

Cornell University ( email )

Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

Marcus E. Raichle

Washington University in St. Louis - Department of Neurology ( email )

St. Louis, MO
United States

Washington University in St. Louis - Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology ( email )

St. Louis, MO
United States

Washington University in St. Louis - Department of Biomedical Engineering ( email )

One Brookings Drive
Campus Box 1208
Saint Louis, MO 63130-4899
United States

(Formerly Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology ( email )

One Brookings Drive
St. Louis, MO 63130
United States

David L. Faigman

University of California Hastings College of the Law ( email )

200 McAllister Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
United States

Joshua Buckholtz

Harvard University ( email )

1875 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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