Perceived Game Uncertainty, Suspense and the Demand for Sport

20 Pages Posted: 5 Dec 2017

See all articles by Tim Pawlowski

Tim Pawlowski

University of Tuebingen

Georgios Nalbantis

University of Tuebingen

Dennis Coates

University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Date Written: January 2018

Abstract

This study tries bridging between different behavioral economic explanations for the lack of support of the uncertainty of outcome hypothesis in spectator sports. We test a measure of perceived game uncertainty that is comparable to objective measures frequently tested in the literature. Econometric results suggest that fans do not perceive closeness of a game differently than how economists have tended to measure it. However, fans' perceptions of suspensefulness are distinct from their perceptions of game uncertainty. Moreover, the finding that fans' preferences for game uncertainty are dominated by loss aversion also emerges—independently of fanship status—in our stated‐preference setting.

JEL Classification: L83, D12, Z2

Suggested Citation

Pawlowski, Tim and Nalbantis, Georgios and Coates, Dennis, Perceived Game Uncertainty, Suspense and the Demand for Sport (January 2018). Economic Inquiry, Vol. 56, Issue 1, pp. 173-192, 2018, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3079056 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ecin.12462

Tim Pawlowski (Contact Author)

University of Tuebingen ( email )

Mohlstrasse 36
Tuebingen, Baden-Wuerttemberg 72074
Germany

Georgios Nalbantis

University of Tuebingen ( email )

Geschwister Scholl Platz
Tübingen, 72070
Germany

Dennis Coates

University of Maryland, Baltimore County ( email )

1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250
United States
410-455-3243 (Phone)
410-455-1054 (Fax)

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