Reconstituting Constitutional Orders

2017 Volume of Yale's Global Constitutionalism Seminar, a Part of the Gruber Program for Global Justice and Women's Rights

Yale Law School, Public Law Research Paper No. 628

437 Pages Posted: 16 Dec 2017  

Cristina Rodriguez

Yale Law School

Manuel Cepeda-Espinosa

Constitutional Court of Colombia

Harold Hongju Koh

Yale Law School

Dieter Grimm

Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin

The Hon. Frank Iacobucci

Supreme Court of Canada

Clare Ryan

Yale University

Miguel Poiares Maduro

European University Institute

Kim Lane Scheppele

Program in Law and Public Affairs, Princeton University; Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University; University Center for Human Values, Princeton University

Kate Stith

Yale University - Law School

Marta Cartabia

Constitutional Court of Italy

Tracey L. Meares

Yale University - Law School

Tom Tyler

Yale University - Law School

Carlos Rosenkrantz

University of San Andres (UMSA)

Judith Resnik

Yale University - Law School

Date Written: September 12, 2017

Abstract

The 2017 volume of Yale's Global Constitutionalism Seminar, a part of the Gruber Program for Global Justice and Women's Rights, Reconstituting Constitutional Orders (co-edited by Judith Resnik and Clare Ryan) inquires into the authority exercised by constitutional courts and reflects on the political and legal shifts that have taken place over the course of 2016-2017.

The first chapter, focused on Brexit and its immediate aftermath, is emblematic of a reconstitution of political-legal orders and provides a backdrop for the chapters to follow. Chapter II, Democratic Authority, Executive Prerogatives, and the Courts, considers how, within given polities, courts respond to claims that the outcomes or structures of democratic processes are unlawful. Chapter III, Disassociation, reflects on disengagement efforts across the globe. Courts have been called upon to examine the domestic processes required to authorize withdrawal and to decide what role (if any) international law plays in determining when a country can reject what were binding treaty obligations. Chapter IV, Exiting by Degree, centers on disengagement within Europe and deepens the puzzle about what disassociation means. It raises the question: when do acts of domestic resistance to what were thought to be accepted norms (such as judicial independence) become a form of disassociation from within?

The last two chapters address a historic function of sovereignty: maintaining peace and security through criminal law and policing. Chapter V, (De)criminalization, address when courts prohibit—or require—criminalization of certain activities. From sexual identity to procreation and assisted suicide, courts have addressed the impact of criminal laws on individual privacy, liberty, autonomy, and free expression. Chapter VI, Constitutional Constraints on Policing, examines how policing has come within the ambit of constitutional courts. This Chapter considers what the constitutional boundaries on policing are in terms of regulating investigations, stops, detention, and the use of force, and how the courts’ rulings reflect democratic commitments to equality and dignity, as well as transnational approaches to police powers.

Suggested Citation

Rodriguez, Cristina and Cepeda-Espinosa, Manuel and Koh, Harold Hongju and Grimm, Dieter and Iacobucci, The Hon. Frank and Ryan, Clare and Maduro, Miguel Poiares and Scheppele, Kim Lane and Stith, Kate and Cartabia, Marta and Meares, Tracey L. and Tyler, Tom and Rosenkrantz, Carlos and Resnik, Judith, Reconstituting Constitutional Orders (September 12, 2017). 2017 Volume of Yale's Global Constitutionalism Seminar, a Part of the Gruber Program for Global Justice and Women's Rights; Yale Law School, Public Law Research Paper No. 628. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3086793

Cristina Rodriguez

Yale Law School ( email )

P.O. Box 208215
New Haven, CT 06520-8215
United States

Manuel Cepeda-Espinosa

Constitutional Court of Colombia

Harold Hongju Koh

Yale Law School ( email )

P.O. Box 208215
New Haven, CT 06520-8215
United States
2034321660 (Phone)

Dieter Grimm

Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin

WallotstraBe 19
14193 Berlin
United States

The Hon. Frank Iacobucci

Supreme Court of Canada

Canada

Clare Ryan

Yale University ( email )

2034327740 (Phone)

Luís Miguel Poiares Pessoa Maduro

European University Institute ( email )

Villa La Pagliaiuola
Via delle Palazzine, 19
San Domenico di Fiesole, FI 50014
Italy

Kim Lane Scheppele

Program in Law and Public Affairs, Princeton University ( email )

Wallace Hall
Princeton, NJ 08544
United States
609-258-6949 (Phone)
609-258-0922 (Fax)

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University ( email )

Princeton University
Princeton, NJ 08544-1021
United States
609-258-6949 (Phone)
609-258-0922 (Fax)

University Center for Human Values, Princeton University ( email )

304 Louis Marx Hall
Princeton, NJ 08544
United States

Kate Stith

Yale University - Law School ( email )

P.O. Box 208215
New Haven, CT 06520-8215
United States
203-432-4835 (Phone)

Marta Cartabia

Constitutional Court of Italy

Italy

Tracey Louise Meares

Yale University - Law School ( email )

P.O. Box 208215
New Haven, CT 06520-8215
United States
203-432-4074 (Phone)
203-432-4876 (Fax)

Tom Tyler

Yale University - Law School ( email )

P.O. Box 208215
New Haven, CT 06520-8215
United States

Carlos Rosenkrantz

University of San Andres (UMSA)

Vita Dumas 284
(1644) Victoria, Pcia
Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires 1644
Argentina

Judith Resnik (Contact Author)

Yale University - Law School ( email )

P.O. Box 208215
New Haven, CT 06520-8215
United States
203-432-1447 (Phone)
203-432-1719 (Fax)

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
155
rank
176,862
Abstract Views
1,017
PlumX