The Determinants of Racial Harassment at the Workplace: Evidence from the British Nursing Profession

21 Pages Posted: 24 Apr 2002

See all articles by Michael A. Shields

Michael A. Shields

University of Melbourne - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Stephen Wheatley Price

University of Leicester - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Abstract

This paper examines which individual and work-related characteristics increase the probability of an employee being racially harassed at the workplace using a unique sample of NHS nurses. The reported incidence of racial harassment at the workplace is staggeringly high - 8.9 per cent of all nurses report such episodes involving work colleagues and 22.4 per cent have experienced such abuse from patients (or their families). Nurses who are young, male or from the ethnic minorities are the most likely to be affected. The findings have important implications for equal opportunities policies and the retention of nursing staff in the NHS.

Suggested Citation

Shields, Michael A. and Wheatley Price, Stephen, The Determinants of Racial Harassment at the Workplace: Evidence from the British Nursing Profession. British Journal of Industrial Relations, Vol. 40, pp. 1-21, 2002. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=308849

Michael A. Shields (Contact Author)

University of Melbourne - Department of Economics ( email )

Victoria 3010, 3010
Australia
+61 3 8344 4656 (Phone)
+61 3 8344 6899 (Fax)

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Stephen Wheatley Price

University of Leicester - Department of Economics ( email )

New Building 325
Leicester LE1 7RH
United Kingdom
+0116 252 5645 (Phone)

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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