The Greening of Christianity? A Study of Environmental Attitudes Over Time

David M. Konisky, "The Greening of Christianity? A Study of Environmental Attitudes Over Time," Environmental Politics, Forthcoming.

36 Pages Posted: 28 Dec 2017  

David Konisky

Indiana University Bloomington - School of Public & Environmental Affairs (SPEA)

Date Written: November 14, 2017

Abstract

Many scholars have recently argued that there has been a "greening of Christianity." These arguments run counter to the ideas of Lynn White and others that have long suggested that the Judeo-Christian tradition fosters a "dominion over nature" ethos. Largely missing from this debate is strong evidence at the individual level that Christians have in fact adopted deeper environmental concerns over time. This study provides such evidence through an examination of longitudinal data from Gallup's annual surveys on the environment. The analysis reveals little evidence that Christians have expressed more environmental concern over time. In fact, across many measures, Christians tend to show less concern about the environment. This pattern holds across Catholic, Protestant, and other Christian denominations and for differing levels of religiosity. These findings support a conclusion that there has not been a discernible "greening of Christianity" among the American public.

Keywords: religion, environmental, attitudes, public opinion

Suggested Citation

Konisky, David, The Greening of Christianity? A Study of Environmental Attitudes Over Time (November 14, 2017). David M. Konisky, "The Greening of Christianity? A Study of Environmental Attitudes Over Time," Environmental Politics, Forthcoming.. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3092262

David Konisky (Contact Author)

Indiana University Bloomington - School of Public & Environmental Affairs (SPEA) ( email )

1315 East Tenth Street
Bloomington, IN 47405
United States

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