Download this Paper Open PDF in Browser

Dissing Disclosure: Just What the Doctor Ordered

110 Pages Posted: 12 Jun 2002  

Grant H. Morris

University of San Diego, School of Law - Professor of Law Emeritus

Abstract

This article traces the development of a patient's right to medical self-determination. It demonstrates that although this right has been boldly proclaimed in court rhetoric, it has been carefully constrained in court decisionmaking. In delineating the duty on physicians to disclose information essential for their patients to make their own decisions, courts have responded more to physician resistance than to patient need. To date, the tort doctrine of informed consent has proven inadequate to achieve true patient autonomy. The article explains why managed care constraints on insurance-covered treatment options and on physician disclosure of noncovered options warrants a reconsideration and expansion of the disclosure duty. Guiding principles are proposed to assure that patients are informed of medically appropriate treatment options even if their insurance will not pay for them.

Suggested Citation

Morris, Grant H., Dissing Disclosure: Just What the Doctor Ordered. Arizona Law Review, Vol. 44, No. 2, Summer 2002. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=309641

Grant Harold Morris (Contact Author)

University of San Diego, School of Law - Professor of Law Emeritus ( email )

5998 Alcala Park
San Diego, CA 92110-2492
United States

Paper statistics

Downloads
84
Rank
251,682
Abstract Views
1,001