Promoting Ethical and Professional Responsibility in Biomedical Informatics Education

4 Pages Posted: 12 Jan 2018

See all articles by Bonnie Kaplan

Bonnie Kaplan

Yale University

Teng Liaw

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Medicine

Vignesh Subbian

The University of Arizona

Karen Courtney

University of Victoria

Harry Hochheiser

University of Pittsburgh

Kenneth W. Goodman

University of Miami

Date Written: March 7, 2017

Abstract

Increasing use of information technologies in clinical care; concerns over the role of algorithmic decision-making in everyday life; collection of vast amounts of physical, social, and personal heath data through devices, social media, and the Internet of Things; and highly-visible, informatics-driven efforts such as the Precision Medicine Initiative, make calls for responsible technology use more important than ever. This rapidly-changing landscape challenges informaticians to understand the ethical, legal, and social (ELSI) implications of these developments and informatics educators to develop approaches for incorporating them into already-crowded curricula.

This workshop will promote discussion of approaches to incorporating ELSI competencies in biomedical informatics education, research, and practice, including:

(1) a survey of foundations and competencies,

(2) current approaches for teaching ELSI concepts, and

(3) experiences, lessons learned, and novel proposals for ELSI instruction in biomedical informatics curricula.

AMIA’s core competencies include fundamental knowledge in “ethical, legal, social issues: for example, human subjects, HIPAA, informed consent, secondary use of data, confidentiality, privacy.” How should these competencies be included and evaluated in a course of study? Are they sufficient for socially responsible and ethical use of technology in biomedicine and health care? The paucity of such topics in biomedical informatics courses and curricula provides an opportunity to elicit diverse opinions and approaches about these questions. Presenters and audience will address them from varying perspectives and educational experiences.

In addition to their expertise in biomedical informatics research and teaching, presenters will draw on their different disciplinary backgrounds (engineering, history, information systems, bioethics, law, social studies of science, computer science, philosophy, human factors, nursing, anthropology, medicine, public health) and country perspectives (US, Canada, Australia) to explore ways to promote ethical and professional responsibility in biomedical informatics.

Suggested Citation

Kaplan, Bonnie and Liaw, Teng and Subbian, Vignesh and Courtney, Karen and Hochheiser, Harry and Goodman, Kenneth W., Promoting Ethical and Professional Responsibility in Biomedical Informatics Education (March 7, 2017). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3099251 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3099251

Bonnie Kaplan (Contact Author)

Yale University ( email )

New Haven, CT 06520
United States

Teng Liaw

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Medicine ( email )

Australia

Vignesh Subbian

The University of Arizona ( email )

College of Engineering
Tucson, AZ 85721
United States

Karen Courtney

University of Victoria ( email )

3800 Finnerty Rd
Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2
Canada

Harry Hochheiser

University of Pittsburgh ( email )

135 N Bellefield Ave
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
United States

Kenneth W. Goodman

University of Miami ( email )

Miami, FL 33136
United States

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