Canadian Strike Replacement Legislation and Collective Bargaining: Lessons for the United States

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS: A JOURNAL OF ECONOMY AND SOCIETY, Vol. 35, No. 2, April 1996

Posted: 21 May 1998

See all articles by John W. Budd

John W. Budd

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Carlson School of Management

Abstract

Opponents of U.S. and Canadian strike replacement legislation contend that restricting the use of strike replacements significantly alters bargaining power and increases strike activity. This article uses data on Canadian manufacturing collective-bargaining agreements to investigate these hypotheses. Although a general ban on strike replacements is found to be associated with longer strikes, little evidence is found to suggest that banning permanent strike replacements significantly influences strike incidence, strike duration, or negotiated wages.

JEL Classification: J53, J58

Suggested Citation

Budd, John W., Canadian Strike Replacement Legislation and Collective Bargaining: Lessons for the United States. INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS: A JOURNAL OF ECONOMY AND SOCIETY, Vol. 35, No. 2, April 1996. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3103

John W. Budd (Contact Author)

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Carlson School of Management ( email )

321 19th Avenue South
Center for Human Resources and Labor Studies
Minneapolis, MN 55455
United States
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HOME PAGE: http://www.johnwbudd.com

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