Indigenous Challenges for Southern Criminology

in Carrington, K., Hogg, R., Scott, J. and Sozzo, M. (eds) Palgrave Handbook on Criminology and the Global South, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke

19 Pages Posted: 28 Jan 2018 Last revised: 10 May 2018

Chris Cunneen

Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research,University of Technology Sydney; University of New South Wales, School of Social Sciences; James Cook University - Cairns Campus

Date Written: December 19, 2017

Abstract

The chapter considers three challenges that Indigenous perspectives provide for Southern criminology: the importance of understanding colonialism and the coloniality of power; the role of Indigenous knowledges, epistemologies and methodologies; and the political questions that Indigenous peoples pose for settler colonial states. The chapter argues that criminology needs to be reconfigured to overcome its historical roots, its epistemological blindspots and its politically compromised positions.

Keywords: Indigenous Peoples, Colonialism, Indigenous epistemology, Indigenous ontology, criminology

Suggested Citation

Cunneen, Chris, Indigenous Challenges for Southern Criminology (December 19, 2017). in Carrington, K., Hogg, R., Scott, J. and Sozzo, M. (eds) Palgrave Handbook on Criminology and the Global South, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3105165

Chris Cunneen (Contact Author)

Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research,University of Technology Sydney ( email )

15 Broadway, Ultimo
PO Box 123
Sydney, NSW 2007
Australia

University of New South Wales, School of Social Sciences ( email )

Kensington, New South Wales 2052
Australia

James Cook University - Cairns Campus ( email )

PO Box 6811
Cairns, Queensland 4870
Australia

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