A Postmodernist Study of Environmental Conversion from Natural to Technological in Neuromancer Through the Lens of Ecocide

11 Pages Posted: 1 Feb 2018

See all articles by Asma Neelam

Asma Neelam

National University of Modern Languages (NU

Saba Zaidi

Sardar Bahadur Khan Women University - Department of English

Date Written: January 24, 2018

Abstract

The pervasive urbanization and technology advancement has almost destroyed the natural order that has caused Ecocide. Humanity is facing a hard time of climatic change and habitat destruction. Although the level of public awareness related to environmental issues has been increased yet this is not sufficient enough to regenerate the old balance of nature. Deterioration in the ecosystem is depicted in most of the Postmodern literature as a constant shift from natural to technological. The cities of today that boast of steel and glass skyscrapers, flyovers, signal towers and elevated freeways (that have greatly influenced nature and humanity) are in an artificial state of make-believe, chaos and doubt. Gibson’s Cyberpunk novel Neuromancer (1984) is an apt example of such kind of chaos, fragmentation, doubt and artificiality that pervades in our society. Neuromancer is a depiction of reality/artifice and natural/unnatural. It is a prophetic discourse of our own not too distant future. This study aims to depict that how Neuromancer represents the artificial and synthetic world of our times. The study is based upon a Postmodernist stance of Ecocide that aspires to signify the depiction of today’s world in the Cyberpunk literature through the novel Neuromancer. Thereof, it equally aims to highlight the significance of Cyberpunk as a Postmodernist genre of literature that is representative of the contemporary society.

Keywords: Ecocide, Cyberpunk, Postmodernism, Conversion, Natural, Technological

Suggested Citation

Neelam, Asma and Zaidi, Saba, A Postmodernist Study of Environmental Conversion from Natural to Technological in Neuromancer Through the Lens of Ecocide (January 24, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3108541 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3108541

Asma Neelam (Contact Author)

National University of Modern Languages (NU

NUML ST-3, Block K, North Nazimabad Karachi
Karachi, Sindh 74600
Pakistan

Saba Zaidi

Sardar Bahadur Khan Women University - Department of English

Brewery Road
Quetta, Balochistan 87300
Pakistan

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