Is the Privacy Paradox in Fact Rational?

13 Pages Posted: 1 Feb 2018

See all articles by Benjamin Agi

Benjamin Agi

IMT Atlantique

Nicolas Jullien

IMT Atlantique; M@rsouin (Môle Amoricain de Recherche sur la Société de l'information et les Usages d'Internet)

Date Written: January 25, 2018

Abstract

Research on the privacy paradox - the dichotomy between individuals’ intentions to disclose personal information and their actual disclosure behavior - has become popular as policy makers have been working on privacy laws. This article provides a literature review of the privacy paradox across fields of study. Many researchers have explored the privacy paradox and come up with the conclusion that decisions taken by individuals regarding the transmission of private data were irrational. This article first provides a systematized review of the extensive literature in psychology, sociology, management, economics and biology that explores the decision-making process related to online transfer of private data. Then, we show that the literature seems to agree on the fact that people act either rationally or with limited rationality. To conclude, we focus on the potential importance of awareness campaigns or key historical moments to explain the different sensitivities people have regarding privacy issues.

Keywords: privacy, privacy paradox, privacy attitude, privacy concern, private data

Suggested Citation

Agi, Benjamin and Jullien, Nicolas, Is the Privacy Paradox in Fact Rational? (January 25, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3109695 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3109695

Benjamin Agi

IMT Atlantique ( email )

46, rue Barrault
Paris, 75013
France

Nicolas Jullien (Contact Author)

IMT Atlantique ( email )

Technopole de Brest Iroise
Brest, 29238
France

M@rsouin (Môle Amoricain de Recherche sur la Société de l'information et les Usages d'Internet) ( email )

France

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