Price Rigidities and the Granular Origins of Aggregate Fluctuations

67 Pages Posted: 6 Feb 2018 Last revised: 21 Apr 2018

See all articles by Ernesto Pasten

Ernesto Pasten

University of Toulouse 1 - Toulouse School of Economics (TSE)

Raphael Schoenle

Brandeis University

Michael Weber

University of Chicago - Finance; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Date Written: February 5, 2018

Abstract

We study the ability of sectoral shocks to generate aggregate fluctuations in a multi-sector general equilibrium model featuring sectoral heterogeneity in price stickiness, sector size, and input-output linkages. We show fat-tailed distributions of sectoral size or network centrality are neither necessary nor sufficient for idiosyncratic shocks to generate aggregate fluctuations when the responsiveness of prices to shocks varies across sectors. We derive conditions under which a frictional origin of aggregate fluctuations arises, that is, when micro shocks contribute to aggregate fluctuations in an economy with heterogeneous price rigidities but equal sector size and network centrality across sectors. We calibrate a 341-sector version of the to the United States and a quantitatively large frictional effect. When we allow for heterogeneities in price rigidity, sector size, and network centrality, the effect of micro shocks on GDP volatility doubles relative to a frictionless economy. Heterogeneity in price rigidity also substantially changes the identity of the sectors from which GDP fluctuations originate.

Keywords: Input-output linkages, nominal price rigidity, idiosyncratic shocks

JEL Classification: E31, E32, O40

Suggested Citation

Pasten, Ernesto and Schoenle, Raphael and Weber, Michael, Price Rigidities and the Granular Origins of Aggregate Fluctuations (February 5, 2018). Bank of Finland Research Discussion Paper No. 3/2018, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3118903

Ernesto Pasten (Contact Author)

University of Toulouse 1 - Toulouse School of Economics (TSE) ( email )

Place Anatole-France
Toulouse Cedex, F-31042
France

Raphael Schoenle

Brandeis University ( email )

Waltham, MA 02454
United States

Michael Weber

University of Chicago - Finance ( email )

5807 S. Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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