Merit Goods

Forthcoming in M. N. S. Sellers and Stephan Kirste (eds.), Encyclopedia of the Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy (Springer)

TILEC Discussion Paper No. DP 2018-008

16 Pages Posted: 8 Feb 2018

See all articles by Péter Cserne

Péter Cserne

University of Northumbria at Newcastle - School of Law; Tilburg Law and Economics Center (TILEC)

Maxime Desmarais-Tremblay

Goldsmiths, University of London; Centre Walras-Pareto, Université de Lausanne

Date Written: February 7, 2018

Abstract

Richard Musgrave coined the terminology of merit wants and merit goods in the 1950s in the context of the theory of public finance. He pointed out that certain goods such as free school lunches or subsidies to low cost housing did not have pure public or private good characteristics. If a government is dissatisfied with the level of consumption of such goods in the free market, it may intervene to increase consumption, even against the wishes of consumers, to promote their private, as well as some social interests. Mainstream economic theory tends to reduce all normative concerns to individual preferences and analyse any domain of the economy, or perhaps of social life, with the same methods. This methodological stance implies some tension between the normative ideas and the standard conceptual tools of economic thinking about public finance. While the concept of merit goods has played a minor role in modern economics, it has the potential to both reveal the continuity with earlier collectivist conceptions of economic and political life and to open the stage for ethical discourses which go beyond rigid versions of libertarianism and welfarism. Hence the continuing relevance of Musgrave’s conceptual innovation for social and political theorizing.

Keywords: Merit Goods, Merit Wants, Government Intervention, Public Economics, Public Goods, Normative Individualism, Paternalism

JEL Classification: A13, B21, B31, H00, H40, H41, H42, H49

Suggested Citation

Cserne, Péter and Desmarais-Tremblay, Maxime, Merit Goods (February 7, 2018). Forthcoming in M. N. S. Sellers and Stephan Kirste (eds.), Encyclopedia of the Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy (Springer); TILEC Discussion Paper No. DP 2018-008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3119566 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3119566

Péter Cserne (Contact Author)

University of Northumbria at Newcastle - School of Law ( email )

Ellison Place 2
Newcastle upon Tyne, North East NE1 8ST
United Kingdom

Tilburg Law and Economics Center (TILEC) ( email )

Warandelaan 2
Tilburg, 5000 LE
Netherlands

Maxime Desmarais-Tremblay

Goldsmiths, University of London ( email )

Lewisham Way
New Cross
London, SE14 6NW
United Kingdom

Centre Walras-Pareto, Université de Lausanne ( email )

Quartier Chambronne
Lausanne, Vaud CH-1015
Switzerland

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
92
Abstract Views
669
rank
299,119
PlumX Metrics