The Unconscionable Impossibility of Reparations for Slavery; Or, Why the Master's Mules Will Never Dismantle the Master's House

Injury and Injustice (Anne Bloom et al eds, Cambridge University Press, 2018)

Thomas Jefferson School of Law Research Paper No. 3123322

16 Pages Posted: 14 Feb 2018 Last revised: 17 Feb 2018

Kaimipono David Wenger

Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Date Written: February 13, 2018

Abstract

This Chapter discusses the curious unwillingness of the legal system to provide compensation for the harms of slavery. Ultimately the Chapter concludes that the failure of law in this area – the impossibility of reparations -- is no accident. Rather, the legal system is doing what it was always designed to do. Law itself is a social construct designed by societal elites to protect elite interests, and the master’s tools will never dismantle the master’s house.

Keywords: reparation, slavery, civil rights

JEL Classification: K00

Suggested Citation

Wenger, Kaimipono David, The Unconscionable Impossibility of Reparations for Slavery; Or, Why the Master's Mules Will Never Dismantle the Master's House (February 13, 2018). Injury and Injustice (Anne Bloom et al eds, Cambridge University Press, 2018); Thomas Jefferson School of Law Research Paper No. 3123322. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3123322

Kaimipono David Wenger (Contact Author)

Thomas Jefferson School of Law ( email )

1155 Island Ave
San Diego, CA 92101
United States
619-961-4347 (Phone)

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
48
Abstract Views
212
PlumX