Law Enforcement and Security Agency Surveillance in Canada: The Growth of Digitally-Enabled Surveillance and Atrophy of Accountability

16 Pages Posted: 7 Mar 2018  

Christopher A. Parsons

University of Toronto, Munk School of Global Affairs, Citizen Lab

Date Written: February 26, 2018

Abstract

This chapter begins with a discussion of real-time electronic surveillance that has historically been conducted in Canada and the importance of government accountability for how law enforcement and security agencies (LESAs) conduct surveillance, as well as why such accountability is essential to the stability of democratic governance. It then proceeds to examine how such surveillance has been transformed in an era of digitization, and how contemporary surveillance simultaneously enables state actors to massively intrude upon Canadians' charter rights. It specifically notes how the atrophy of accountability regimes raise serious concerns for the democratic legitimacy of government surveillance activities. The chapter concludes by briefly outlining how surveillance accountability regimes might be rehabilitated and what such habilitation would mean for rendering government bulk surveillance activities more accountable to legislative assemblies and citizens alike.

Keywords: Canada, Surveillance, Privacy, Law Enforcement, Security Services

Suggested Citation

Parsons, Christopher A., Law Enforcement and Security Agency Surveillance in Canada: The Growth of Digitally-Enabled Surveillance and Atrophy of Accountability (February 26, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3130240 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3130240

Christopher A. Parsons (Contact Author)

University of Toronto, Munk School of Global Affairs, Citizen Lab ( email )

Toronto, Ontario
Canada

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