3D Printing and Beyond: Intellectual Property and Regulation

Dinusha Mendis, Mark Lemley, and Matthew Rimmer, 3D Printing and Beyond: Intellectual Property and Regulation. Edward Elgar Publishing Limited, Cheltenham and Northampton, MA, 2019 (Forthcoming)

Stanford Public Law Working Paper

Posted: 10 Aug 2018

See all articles by Dinusha Mendis

Dinusha Mendis

Bournemouth University

Mark A. Lemley

Stanford Law School

Matthew Rimmer

Queensland University of Technology (QUT)

Date Written: January 26, 2019

Abstract

Along with experts from around the world, Mendis, Lemley and Rimmer consider the legal and intellectual property implications relating to 3D printing and emerging technologies in the UK, USA, and Australia. This edited book will consider the legal and intellectual property (IP) implications relating to 3D printing and emerging technologies from the perspective of UK, USA and Australia. The book aims to provide an in-depth consideration of the intellectual property implications of 3D printing, before moving on to a consideration of the legal and intellectual property challenges posed by future and emerging technologies. As such, the book will set out some of the most pressing challenges for intellectual property in the present times, as a result of 3D printing before moving on to a consideration of the future by discussing not only intellectual property, but also other legal challenges (i.e., contractual, privacy, ethical issues) as a result of emerging technologies with the focus kept firmly on the three chosen jurisdictions. Introduction From the Maker Movement to the 3D Printing Era: Opportunities and Challenges - Dinusha Mendis, Mark Lemley and Matthew Rimmer Chapter 1: IP in a world without scarcity – Mark Lemley PART ONE UNITED KINGDOM Chapter 2: ‘Mind the gap’: From engravings to 3D designs and 3D scans – re-evaluating copyright law in a 3D printing world – Dinusha Mendis Chapter 3: Design rights and 3D printing in the UK: Balancing innovation and creativity in a (dis)harmonised and fragmented legal framework – Thomas Margoni Chapter 4: Digital trade mark infringement and 3D printing implications: What does the future hold? – Dukki Hong and Simon Bradshaw Chapter 5: 3D printing and patent law – apt and ready? – Marc Mimler Chapter 6: Transformative technologies and responsive legal scholarship – Roger Brownsword PART TWO UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Chapter 7: 3D printing and US copyright law: implications for software, enforcement and looking ahead to business strategies – Peter Menell and Ryan Vacca Chapter 8: Integrating a classic tool for a modern US challenge: US design patents implications for 3D printing – Elizabeth Ferrill, Robert MacKichan, Christopher McKinley and Kelly Horn Chapter 9: How 3D printing disrupts trade dress protection and resurrects the need for source and quality assurance – Deven Desai Chapter 10: Remedies for digital patent infringement: A perspective from USA – Timothy Holbrook Chapter 11: How democratized production challenges society’s ability to regulate – Deven Desai PART THREE AUSTRALIA Chapter 12: Makers Empire: Australian copyright law, 3D printing and the ‘Ideas Boom’ – Matthew Rimmer Chapter 13: ‘Substantial similarity’ under Australian design law: application to 3D printing – Tyrone Berger Chapter 14: Trade mark controversies in 3D printing: An Australian perspective – Amanda Scardamaglia Chapter 15: The reform challenge: Australian patent law and the emergence of 3D printing – Jane Nielsen and Dianne Nicol Chapter 16: Don’t believe the hype? Recent 3D printing developments for law and society – Angela Daly Conclusion: The future of printcrime: intellectual property, innovation law and 3D printing – Dinusha Mendis, Mark Lemley and Matthew Rimmer.

Keywords: 3D Printing, Additive Manufacturing, The Maker Movement, Copyright Law, Designs Law, Trademark Law, Patent Law, Trade Secrets, Emerging Technologies, Regulation, Intellectual Property

Suggested Citation

Mendis, Dinusha and Lemley, Mark A. and Rimmer, Matthew, 3D Printing and Beyond: Intellectual Property and Regulation (January 26, 2019). Dinusha Mendis, Mark Lemley, and Matthew Rimmer, 3D Printing and Beyond: Intellectual Property and Regulation. Edward Elgar Publishing Limited, Cheltenham and Northampton, MA, 2019 (Forthcoming); Stanford Public Law Working Paper. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3130443

Dinusha Mendis

Bournemouth University ( email )

Fern Barrow
Poole BH12 5BB, Dorset BH8 8EB
United Kingdom

Mark A. Lemley

Stanford Law School ( email )

559 Nathan Abbott Way
Stanford, CA 94305-8610
United States

Matthew Rimmer (Contact Author)

Queensland University of Technology (QUT) ( email )

Level 4, C Block Gardens Point
2 George St
Brisbane, Queensland QLD 4000
Australia

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