Gender-Matching School Effects on Girls’ Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Performance – Empirical Evidence From South Korea

MAGKS DP No. 38-2017

47 Pages Posted: 7 Mar 2018

See all articles by Seo-Young Cho

Seo-Young Cho

University of Marburg - School of Business & Economics

Date Written: December 15, 2017

Abstract

This paper investigates whether gender-matching school environments can improve girls’ interest and motivation in science. Using the PISA data from South Korea, the empirical results of this paper show that gender-matching school environments have the most positive effect on the attitudinal development of girls who are at the highest quartile of science studies. By attending an all-girls school and being taught by a female science teacher, high-performing girls become as motivated and interested in pursuing science studies and careers as boys. Additionally, female teachers generally have a positive effect on developing girls’ competitive attitudes regardless of their cognitive performance. However, the effect of single-sex schooling is heterogeneous across different student groups. While maintaining its positive effect on high and low-performing girls, attending an all-girls school can be detrimental to the non-cognitive development of median girls. These findings corroborate that gender-matching school environments can be a useful policy instrument that promotes female talent in STEM fields, but the positive effect is not universal and thus cannot be generalized for everyone.

Keywords: Gender-Matching Effects, Student-Teacher Gender-Matching, Single-Sex Schooling, Cognitive Performance, Non-Cognitive Performance, Education Production Functions, Propensity Score Matching, South Korea

JEL Classification: C31, I21, I24, J16, O53

Suggested Citation

Cho, Seo-Young, Gender-Matching School Effects on Girls’ Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Performance – Empirical Evidence From South Korea (December 15, 2017). MAGKS DP No. 38-2017, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3131765 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3131765

Seo-Young Cho (Contact Author)

University of Marburg - School of Business & Economics ( email )

Barfuessertor 2
Marburg, Hessen 35037
Germany

HOME PAGE: http://www.economics-human-trafficking.org/

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
15
Abstract Views
307
PlumX Metrics