Making Sense From (Apparent) Senselessness: The JCR Lens

Posted: 11 Mar 2018

See all articles by Darren W. Dahl

Darren W. Dahl

University of British Columbia (UBC) - Sauder School of Business

Eileen Fischer

York University - Schulich School of Business

Gita Johar

Columbia Business School - Marketing

Vicki Morwitz

New York University (NYU) - Department of Marketing

Date Written: March 7, 2018

Abstract

What explains the emergence of nativist and populist movements across the globe? From the election of Donald Trump to the vote for Brexit, pundits wonder how and why these unforeseen outcomes came to pass. Why were people so surprised about these outcomes? Why do people sometimes vote against their self-interest? And why do people fall prey to fake news and believe seemingly outrageous claims? In this, our last editorial, we claim that some answers to these questions can be found in the pages of this journal — in articles published in JCR. While JCR welcomes and publishes many different types of papers, it has traditionally focused on theory building, and our goal in this article is to show how rich and robust theoretical work — uncovering the “why” behind effect s— can help us explain and understand events. In our view, such understanding remains a key goal of science, even though immediate practical application of many JCR papers may not seem obvious.

We will address the first two questions relying on the literatures on optimism, motivated reasoning and forgetting, survey and prediction pool biases, the affective bases for decisions, and the potential for social performance and media influence. Then we turn to a critical question that looms large and could provoke undesired consequences: how do people determine whether a claim is true?

Keywords: Politics, Optimism, Motivated Reasoning, Survey Biases, Affect, Truth

Suggested Citation

Dahl, Darren W. and Fischer, Eileen and Johar, Gita and Morwitz, Vicki, Making Sense From (Apparent) Senselessness: The JCR Lens (March 7, 2018). Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 44, No. 4, 2017, Columbia Business School Research Paper No. 18-28, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3136038

Darren W. Dahl

University of British Columbia (UBC) - Sauder School of Business ( email )

2053 Main Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2
Canada
604-822-8346 (Phone)

Eileen Fischer

York University - Schulich School of Business ( email )

4700 Keele Street
Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3
Canada

Gita Johar (Contact Author)

Columbia Business School - Marketing ( email )

New York, NY 10027
United States

Vicki Morwitz

New York University (NYU) - Department of Marketing ( email )

Henry Kaufman Ctr
44 W 4 St.
New York, NY
United States

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