From Imperial to International Law: Protecting Foreign Expectations in the Early United States

16 Pages Posted: 9 Mar 2018

Date Written: March 8, 2018

Abstract

This Essay argues that several principles associated with modern international investment law and dispute resolution arose in the wake of the American Revolution, as the revolutionaries and Britons sought to restructure trade relations, previously regulated by imperial law, under new treaties and the law of nations. They negotiated such problems as the currency in which international debts would be paid; the ability of foreign creditors pursue domestic collection remedies; whether creditors had to exhaust those remedies before their nation could resort to international arbitration; and the form of state-state arbitration of private disputes. The specific setting of these negotiations — the aftermath of a colonial settler revolution — narrowed the compass of disagreement, compared to many later postcolonial negotiations. In addition, the negotiations assumed that the exhaustion of national remedies remained the standard method of resolving private debt disputes. Notwithstanding these important differences, the principles and institutions developed after an imperial civil war influenced the development of international investment law.

Suggested Citation

Hulsebosch, Daniel J., From Imperial to International Law: Protecting Foreign Expectations in the Early United States (March 8, 2018). UCLA Law Review Discourse, Vol. 65, No. 142, 2018; NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 18-13. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3136676

Daniel J. Hulsebosch (Contact Author)

New York University School of Law ( email )

40 Washington Square South
503
New York, NY 10012-1099
United States

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