Constitutional Recognition and Reform: Developing an Inclusive Australian Citizenship Through Treaty

(2018) 53 Australian Journal of Political Science (Forthcoming)

18 Pages Posted: 19 Mar 2018  

Harry Hobbs

University of New South Wales (UNSW), Faculty of Law, Students

Date Written: March 14, 2018

Abstract

Eight years after the Expert Panel on Recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Australian Constitution was established, institutional reform to empower Indigenous peoples in this country has not been realised. This article argues that the persistent failure to progress constitutional reform stems, in part, from dominant conceptions of Australian citizenship that deny Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoplehood. It follows that meaningful institutional reform is possible only if Australian citizenship is reconceptualised in a manner that makes room for the distinctive status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Treaties offer a path forward to develop this new understanding of Australian identity and ground institutional reform.

Keywords: citizenship, treaty, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, Indigenous, shared-fate, constitutional reform, constitutional recognition

Suggested Citation

Hobbs, Harry, Constitutional Recognition and Reform: Developing an Inclusive Australian Citizenship Through Treaty (March 14, 2018). (2018) 53 Australian Journal of Political Science (Forthcoming). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3140463

Harry Hobbs (Contact Author)

University of New South Wales (UNSW), Faculty of Law, Students ( email )

Sydney
Australia

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