Using Participatory Design to Give Foster Teens a Voice in Designs for Their Own Online Safety

Wisniewski, P., Badillo-Urquiola, K.*, Stanfill, M., and Salter, A. (2017) “Using Participatory Design to Give Foster Teens a Voice in Designs for Their Own Online Safety,” Extended Abstract presented at the Workshop on Design Methods for Underserved Communities at the 2017 ACM Conference on Comput

4 Pages Posted: 20 Mar 2018

See all articles by Pamela Wisniewski

Pamela Wisniewski

University of Central Florida

Karla Badillo-Urquiola

University of Central Florida, Modeling and Simulation Graduate Program, Students

Mel Stanfill

University of Central Florida

Anastasia Salter

University of Central Florida

Date Written: March 1, 2017

Abstract

Compared to typical teens, teens in foster care face higher levels of offline risks, but little research has determined if this is also true regarding their online risk experiences. Yet, studying this underserved population poses many ethical challenges, including: 1) consent and assent, 2) confidentiality and privacy, and 3) sensitive data. We propose using participatory design as a method to help ensure that the ethical concerns around balancing privacy and disclosure, trade-offs between privacy and beneficial outcomes, and collecting and analyzing foster youth data, are calibrated to the specific needs of our user population.

Keywords: Adolescents, Foster Care, Ethics, Participatory Design

Suggested Citation

Wisniewski, Pamela and Badillo-Urquiola, Karla and Stanfill, Mel and Salter, Anastasia, Using Participatory Design to Give Foster Teens a Voice in Designs for Their Own Online Safety (March 1, 2017). Wisniewski, P., Badillo-Urquiola, K.*, Stanfill, M., and Salter, A. (2017) “Using Participatory Design to Give Foster Teens a Voice in Designs for Their Own Online Safety,” Extended Abstract presented at the Workshop on Design Methods for Underserved Communities at the 2017 ACM Conference on Comput, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3141454

Pamela Wisniewski (Contact Author)

University of Central Florida ( email )

4000 Central Florida Blvd
Orlando, FL 32816-1400
United States

Karla Badillo-Urquiola

University of Central Florida, Modeling and Simulation Graduate Program, Students ( email )

Partnership II Building Suite 131
3100 Technology Parkway
Orlando, FL 32826
United States

Mel Stanfill

University of Central Florida ( email )

4000 Central Florida Blvd
Orlando, FL 32816-1400
United States

Anastasia Salter

University of Central Florida ( email )

4000 Central Florida Blvd
Orlando, FL 32816-1400
United States

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