Work-Related Stress, Quitting Intentions and Absenteeism

28 Pages Posted: 17 Jun 2002

See all articles by Rannia M. Leontaridi

Rannia M. Leontaridi

Office of the Prime Minister - Strategy Unit

Melanie E. Ward-Warmedinger

European Central Bank (ECB); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Date Written: May 2002

Abstract

The paper uses data from the International Social Surveys Program (ISSP) to investigate work-related stress among a group of 15 OECD countries. It examines the determinants of work-related stress and explores the importance of work-related stress as a predictor of individuals' quitting behaviour and the rate of absenteeism. We find that those individuals reporting to experience at least some stress in their current position are 10 - 14 % more likely to hold intentions to quit or be absent from work than those without any job stress, with the probability of intending to quit or being absent increasing with successively higher workrelated stress levels.

Keywords: Job Stress, Quits, Turnover, Absenteeism

JEL Classification: J22, J28, J63, I10

Suggested Citation

Leontaridi, Rannia M. and Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E., Work-Related Stress, Quitting Intentions and Absenteeism (May 2002). IZA Discussion Paper No. 493. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=314207

Rannia M. Leontaridi (Contact Author)

Office of the Prime Minister - Strategy Unit

Melanie E. Ward-Warmedinger

European Central Bank (ECB) ( email )

Sonnemannstrasse 22
Frankfurt am Main, 60314
Germany

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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