Economics Teaching in Australian Universities: Rewards and Outcomes

14 Pages Posted: 18 Mar 2003

See all articles by Ross S. Guest

Ross S. Guest

Griffith University - School of Accounting and Finance - Gold Coast Campus

Alan Duhs

University of Queensland - School of Economics

Abstract

This paper presents evidence from two surveys to help explain the poor ratings consistently given to the teaching of economics at Australian universities. The evidence suggests that the poor ratings of economics teaching can be attributed to two related factors: inappropriate pedagogical practices and lack of rewards for allocating additional time to teaching. The survey data on pedagogy in economics consist of 205 responses from graduates from two Queensland universities. The time elapsed since graduation ranges from 1 to 10 years. The survey data on academics' time allocation consist of 290 responses from academic economists across a wide range of Australian universities.

Suggested Citation

Guest, Ross and Duhs, Alan, Economics Teaching in Australian Universities: Rewards and Outcomes. Economic Record, Vol. 78, pp. 147-160, 2002. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=314312

Ross Guest (Contact Author)

Griffith University - School of Accounting and Finance - Gold Coast Campus ( email )

PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre
9726 Queensland
Australia

Alan Duhs

University of Queensland - School of Economics ( email )

Brisbane, QLD 4072
Australia

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