Burón v Denman (1848)

Chapter of Charles Mitchell and Paul Mitchell (eds), Landmark Cases in the Law of Tort (Oxford: Hart, 2010)

35 Pages Posted: 2 Apr 2018

See all articles by Charles Mitchell

Charles Mitchell

University College London - Faculty of Laws

Leslie Turano Taylor

Independent

Date Written: March 27, 2018

Abstract

Discusses Buron v Denman, an action for trespass to goods by a Spanish slaver against a British naval captain, which was one of the last cases in which an English court recognised a plaintiff’s property rights in other human beings. The case is also a milestone in the development of the rule that ratification of an agent’s unauthorised acts can take effect in the same way as prior authorisation. It also remains a significant authority for the rule that a person who commits a tort in a foreign state against a foreign national has a personal immunity from suit if he acts in an official capacity with the result that his actions constitute an act of state.

Keywords: Slavery, anti-slavery movement, abolition, Lord Denman, tort law, legal history, agency law, ratification, act of state defence

Suggested Citation

Mitchell, Charles and Turano Taylor, Leslie, Burón v Denman (1848) (March 27, 2018). Chapter of Charles Mitchell and Paul Mitchell (eds), Landmark Cases in the Law of Tort (Oxford: Hart, 2010). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3150265

Charles Mitchell (Contact Author)

University College London - Faculty of Laws ( email )

Gower St
London WC1E OEG, WC1E 6BT
United Kingdom

Leslie Turano Taylor

Independent ( email )

No Address Available

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