Regulating Offshore Finance

49 Pages Posted: 10 Apr 2018 Last revised: 21 Jul 2018

William J. Moon

University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Date Written: March 30, 2018

Abstract

From the Panama Papers to the Paradise Papers, massive document leaks in recent years have exposed trillions of dollars hidden in small offshore jurisdictions. Attracting foreign capital with low tax rates and environments of secrecy, a growing number of offshore jurisdictions have emerged as major financial havens hosting thousands of hedge funds, trusts, banks, and insurance companies.

While the prevailing account has examined offshore financial havens as “tax havens” that facilitate the evasion or avoidance of domestic tax, this Article uncovers how offshore jurisdictions enable corporations to evade domestic regulatory law. Specifically, recent U.S. Supreme Court cases restricting the geographic scope of federal statutes have created a space for commercial actors to circumvent regulation by incorporating in offshore jurisdictions. Under this jurisprudence, financial transactions completed through offshore commercial entities are often, albeit not categorically, seen as “extraterritorial” transactions beyond the reach of federal statutes. This makes it increasingly difficult for private litigants to bring statutory claims designed to protect the workings of the market, even in cases that are predominantly connected to the United States. After documenting how offshore jurisdictions enable commercial entities to opt out of federal regulatory statutes, this Article critiques the Supreme Court’s recent extraterritoriality jurisprudence that risks breeding a cottage industry of private regulatory evasion.

Keywords: offshore finance, federal extraterritoriality, tax havens, business organizations, conflict of laws, hedge funds, offshore banks, jurisdictional competition, securities regulation, RICO, Bankruptcy Code, Madoff litigation

Suggested Citation

Moon, William J., Regulating Offshore Finance (March 30, 2018). Forthcoming, Vanderbilt Law Review, Vol. 72, 2019. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3153121

William J. Moon (Contact Author)

University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law ( email )

500 W. Baltimore Street
Baltimore, MD 21201-1
United States

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