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Decoding the Influence of Anticipatory States on Visual Perception in the Presence of Temporal Distractors

16 Pages Posted: 5 Apr 2018 Publication Status: Review Complete

See all articles by Freek van Ede

Freek van Ede

University of Oxford - Oxford Centre for Human Brain Activity

Sammi R Chekroud

University of Oxford - Department of Experimental Psychology

Mark G Stokes

University of Oxford - Department of Experimental Psychology

Anna C Nobre

University of Oxford - Department of Experimental Psychology

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Abstract

While it has long been recognised that anticipatory states amplify early EEG responses to visual targets in humans, it remains unclear how such modulations relate to the actual content of the neural representation. Using multivariate orientation decoding of high temporal‐resolution EEG recordings, we demonstrate that anticipation also increases the amount of stimulus‐identity information contained in these early brain responses. Furthermore, this approach enabled us to characterize the influence of temporally adjacent distractors on target identity decoding, revealing that anticipation did not just attenuate distractor interference on target representations but, instead, delayed it. Enhanced target decoding and distractor resilience were further predicted by the attenuation of posterior 8‐14 Hz alpha oscillations. The findings offer several novel insights into how anticipatory states prioritise relevant sensory input in time, and they highlight the potential of non‐invasive multivariate electrophysiology to track cognitive influences on perception in tasks with rapidly changing displays.

Suggested Citation

van Ede, Freek and Chekroud, Sammi R and Stokes, Mark G and Nobre, Anna C, Decoding the Influence of Anticipatory States on Visual Perception in the Presence of Temporal Distractors (2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3155565 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3155565
This version of the paper has not been formally peer reviewed.

Freek Van Ede (Contact Author)

University of Oxford - Oxford Centre for Human Brain Activity ( email )

Warneford Hospital
Oxford, OX3 7JX
United Kingdom

Sammi R Chekroud

University of Oxford - Department of Experimental Psychology

Oxford, OX3 9DU
United Kingdom

Mark G Stokes

University of Oxford - Department of Experimental Psychology

Oxford, OX3 9DU
United Kingdom

Anna C Nobre

University of Oxford - Department of Experimental Psychology

Oxford, OX3 9DU
United Kingdom

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