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Precise Tuning of Cortical Contractility Regulates Mechanical Equilibrium During Cell Division

55 Pages Posted: 5 Apr 2018 Sneak Peek Status: Review Complete

See all articles by Nilay Taneja

Nilay Taneja

Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

Matthew R. Bersi

Vanderbilt University - Department of Biomedical Engineering

Aidan M. Fenix

Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

John C. Snider

Vanderbilt University - Department of Biomedical Engineering

James A. Cooper

Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

Ryoma Ohi

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Medical School, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

Vivian Gama

Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

W. David Merryman

Vanderbilt University - Department of Biomedical Engineering

Dylan T. Burnette

Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

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Abstract

The mechanical properties of the cellular cortex drive shape changes during cell division, cell migration and tissue morphogenesis. Cell division provides an ideal paradigm to study cortical mechanics as it has two well defined cortical networks: equatorial and polar. Contractile force generated by the molecular motor myosin II (MII) at the equatorial cortex drives cleavage furrow ingression. Outward pressures created by furrow ingression must be counteracted by MII contractility at the polar cortex. How a mechanical equilibrium between these two networks is maintained is poorly understood. Combining experimental and mathematical approaches, we show a balance between the kinetic properties of MII isoforms allows both rapid force generation at the equatorial cortex and slow tension generation at the polar cortex. Our model suggests myosin contractility in the cortex is locally regulated to tune the magnitude of force generation. This regulatory mechanism will likely be applicable to numerous processes driven by MII contractility.

Suggested Citation

Taneja, Nilay and Bersi, Matthew R. and Fenix, Aidan M. and Snider, John C. and Cooper, James A. and Ohi, Ryoma and Gama, Vivian and Merryman, W. David and Burnette, Dylan T., Precise Tuning of Cortical Contractility Regulates Mechanical Equilibrium During Cell Division (2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3155577 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3155577
This is a paper under consideration at Cell Press and has not been peer-reviewed.

Nilay Taneja (Contact Author)

Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

Nashville, TN 37232-0685
United States

Matthew R. Bersi

Vanderbilt University - Department of Biomedical Engineering

Nashville, TN 37232-0685
United States

Aidan M. Fenix

Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

Nashville, TN 37232-0685
United States

John C. Snider

Vanderbilt University - Department of Biomedical Engineering

Nashville, TN 37232-0685
United States

James A. Cooper

Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

Nashville, TN 37232-0685
United States

Ryoma Ohi

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Medical School, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

Ann Arbor, MI
United States

Vivian Gama

Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

Nashville, TN 37232-0685
United States

W. David Merryman

Vanderbilt University - Department of Biomedical Engineering

Nashville, TN 37232-0685
United States

Dylan T. Burnette

Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

Nashville, TN 37232-0685
United States

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