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Large Differences in Small RNA Composition Between Human Biofluids

47 Pages Posted: 6 Apr 2018 Sneak Peek Status: Published

See all articles by Paula M. Godoy

Paula M. Godoy

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Lung Biology Center

Nirav R. Bhakta

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy and Sleep Medicine

Andrea J. Barczak

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Lung Biology Center

Hakan Cakmak

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences

Susan Fisher

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences

Tippi C. Mackenzie

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Tushar Patel

Mayo Clinic - Florida - Transplant Center

Richard W. Price

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Neurology

JamesF. Smith

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Urology

Prescott G. Woodruff

Genentech, Inc. - San Francisco - Antibody Engineering; University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy and Sleep Medicine

David J. Erle

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Lung Biology Center

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Abstract

Extracellular miRNAs and other small RNAs are implicated in cellular communication and may be useful as disease biomarkers. We systematically compared small RNAs in 12 human biofluid types using RNA-seq. miRNAs and tRNA-derived RN As (tDRs) accounted for the majority of mapped reads in all biofluids, but the ratio of miRNA to tDR reads varied from 72 in plasma to 0.004 in bile. miRNA levels were highly correlated across all biofluids but levels of some miRNAs differed markedly between biofluids. tDR populations differed extensively between biofluids. YRNA fragments were seen in all biofluids and accounted for >10% of reads in blood plasma, serum, and CSF. Reads mapping exclusively to piRNAs were very rare except in seminal plasma. These results demonstrate extensive differences in small RNAs between human biofluids and provide a useful resource for investigating extracellular RNA biology and developing biomarkers.

Suggested Citation

Godoy, Paula M. and Bhakta, Nirav R. and Barczak, Andrea J. and Cakmak, Hakan and Fisher, Susan and Mackenzie, Tippi C. and Patel, Tushar and Price, Richard W. and Smith, JamesF and Woodruff, Prescott G. and Erle, David J., Large Differences in Small RNA Composition Between Human Biofluids (2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3155656 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3155656
This is a paper under consideration at Cell Press and has not been peer-reviewed.

Paula M. Godoy

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Lung Biology Center

San Francisco, CA 94143-2922
United States

Nirav R. Bhakta

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy and Sleep Medicine

San Francisco General Hospital
Box 2911
San Francisco, CA
United States

Andrea J. Barczak

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Lung Biology Center

San Francisco, CA 94143-2922
United States

Hakan Cakmak

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences

San Francisco, CA 94143
United States

Susan Fisher

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences

San Francisco, CA 94143
United States

Tippi C. Mackenzie

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

San Francisco, CA 94143
United States

Tushar Patel

Mayo Clinic - Florida - Transplant Center ( email )

Jacksonville, FL 32224
United States

Richard W. Price

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Neurology

San Francisco, CA 94143
United States

JamesF Smith

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Department of Urology

San Francisco, CA 94143
United States

Prescott G. Woodruff

Genentech, Inc. - San Francisco - Antibody Engineering

1 DNA Way
San Francisco, CA
United States

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy and Sleep Medicine

San Francisco General Hospital
Box 2911
San Francisco, CA
United States

David J. Erle (Contact Author)

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) - Lung Biology Center ( email )

San Francisco, CA 94143-2922
United States

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