Security and the Anthropocene: Law, International Relations and Criminology

Annual Review of Law and Social Science, Vol 14, 2018

Posted: 1 May 2018 Last revised: 12 May 2018

See all articles by Cameron Holley

Cameron Holley

UNSW Sydney, Faculty of Law, Connected Waters Initiative Research Centre, Global Water Institute; University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law

Clifford Shearing

Griffith Institute of Criminology; University of Cape Town; University of Montreal, School of Criminology; University of New South Wales

Cameron Harrington

Durham University - School of Government and International Affairs

Amanda Kennedy

University of New England (Australia) - School of Law

Tariro Mutongwizo

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law

Date Written: March 1, 2018

Abstract

This article analyses the implications of the Anthropocene for the governance of security. Drawing on environmental law, green criminology and international relations the article analyses the development of environment and security scholarship over recent decades and shown similarities and differences in perspectives across the disciplines. It demonstrates that the Anthropocene represents a significant challenge for thinking about and responding to security and the environment. It argues a rethinking is needed and can benefit from reaching across the disciplinary divide in three key areas that have become a shared focus of attention and debate regarding security in the Anthropocene. These are first, examining the implications of the Anthropocene for our understanding of environment and security; second, addressing and resolving contest across environmental securities through more holistic and integrated thinking and practice; and third, developing new governance responses that mix polycentric and state backed regulation to bring safety and security to the planet.

Suggested Citation

Holley, Cameron and Shearing, Clifford D and Harrington, Cameron and Kennedy, Amanda and Mutongwizo, Tariro, Security and the Anthropocene: Law, International Relations and Criminology (March 1, 2018). Annual Review of Law and Social Science, Vol 14, 2018, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3158874

Cameron Holley (Contact Author)

UNSW Sydney, Faculty of Law, Connected Waters Initiative Research Centre, Global Water Institute ( email )

UNSW
Sydney, New South Wales 2052
Australia

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law ( email )

Kensington, New South Wales 2052
Australia

Clifford D Shearing

Griffith Institute of Criminology ( email )

170 Kessels Road
Nathan, Queensland QLD 4111
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://https://experts.griffith.edu.au/academic/c.shearing

University of Cape Town ( email )

Private Bag X3
Rondebosch, Western Cape 7701
South Africa

HOME PAGE: http://www.publiclaw.uct.ac.za/pbl/staff/cshearing

University of Montreal, School of Criminology ( email )

C.P. 6128 succursale Centre-ville
Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7
Canada

University of New South Wales ( email )

Sydney
Australia

Cameron Harrington

Durham University - School of Government and International Affairs ( email )

Durham, DH1 3HP
United Kingdom

Amanda Kennedy

University of New England (Australia) - School of Law ( email )

Australia

Tariro Mutongwizo

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law ( email )

Kensington, New South Wales 2052
Australia

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