The Effect of Brainstorming Guidelines on Individual Auditors’ Identification of Potential Frauds

Posted: 28 Apr 2018

See all articles by Wei Chen

Wei Chen

Independent

Amna Khalifa

University of New South Wales, School of Accounting

Kate Morgan

UNSW Business School

Ken Trotman

UNSW Australia Business School, School of Accounting

Date Written: October 26, 2017

Abstract

Revised auditing standards and a focus by regulators on the detection of financial statement fraud have resulted in calls for research to examine alternative forms of fraud brainstorming. We examine the effect of using extended brainstorming guidelines, developed in the psychology literature as part of facilitator training, on auditors’ individual brainstorming performance prior to attending the team brainstorming meeting. We find that these additional brainstorming guidelines help auditors identify a greater quantity and quality of potential frauds. Our findings suggest an easy to implement approach to enhance auditors’ performance in fraud brainstorming.

Keywords: audit planning, brainstorming guidelines, fraud identification, individual brainstorming

Suggested Citation

Chen, Wei and Khalifa, Amna and Morgan, Kate and Trotman, Ken, The Effect of Brainstorming Guidelines on Individual Auditors’ Identification of Potential Frauds (October 26, 2017). Australian Journal of Management, Vol. 43, No. 2, 2018, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3159900

Amna Khalifa

University of New South Wales, School of Accounting ( email )

Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia

Kate Morgan

UNSW Business School

UNSW Business School
High St
Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia

Ken Trotman

UNSW Australia Business School, School of Accounting ( email )

Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia

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