CIA Drone Strikes in Pakistan: History, Perception and Future

CRSS (2017)

47 Pages Posted: 29 Apr 2018

See all articles by Farooq Yousaf

Farooq Yousaf

University of Newcastle, Department of Politics, Faculty of Business and Law

Date Written: December 1, 2017

Abstract

This report is a part of CRSS’s special publication series that focuses on perception and impact of drone strikes on security and counter-terrorism in Pakistan. The report discusses the background of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)-operated US drone strikes in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), along with how the success of the first strike and the confusion surrounding it gave the US an unmanned option to target alleged terror heads in the region. Since the first strike in 2004 which targeted Taliban leader Nek Muhammad Wazir, the US has conducted over 400 strikes in various areas of FATA. These strikes on the one hand have resulted in the elimination of high profile targets, while on the other, have contributed to civilian casualties. There are conflicting opinions and sentiments on the issue both abroad and in Pakistan, with arguments that such strikes have led to a spike in extremism and terrorism in FATA. The primary survey conducted in this report suggests that drones remain a complex issue with competing narratives. There are also a significant number of respondents from FATA who believe that drones not only eliminate terrorists, but are also the least of three evils: military operations, Taliban and drones. Finally, the report recommends that if the government of Pakistan has a tacit drone deal with the US government and believes drones are effective in FATA, it needs to formulate an effective and clear narrative in order to give clarity.

Keywords: Drones, Drone Strikes, FATA, Pashtuns, Tribal Areas, Legality, Legitimacy

Suggested Citation

Yousaf, Farooq, CIA Drone Strikes in Pakistan: History, Perception and Future (December 1, 2017). CRSS (2017). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3160433 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3160433

Farooq Yousaf (Contact Author)

University of Newcastle, Department of Politics, Faculty of Business and Law ( email )

Newcastle, NSW 2300
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://https://www.newcastle.edu.au/profile/farooq-yousaf-uon

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
28
Abstract Views
173
PlumX Metrics