Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones or Dead Ends?

25 Pages Posted: 15 Dec 2002

See all articles by Alison L. Booth

Alison L. Booth

Australian National University (ANU) - Research School of Social Sciences (RSSS); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Marco Francesconi

University of Essex; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

Jeff Frank

University of London, Royal Holloway College - Department of Economics

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Abstract

In Britain, about 7% of male employees and 10% of female employees are in temporary jobs. This proportion has been relatively stable over the 1990s. Using data from the British Household Panel Survey, we confirm the popular perception that temporary jobs are generally not desirable when compared to permanent employment. Temporary workers have lower levels of job satisfaction, receive less training and are less well-paid. There is some evidence that fixed-term contracts are a stepping stone to permanent work. Women who start in fixed-term employment and move to permanent jobs fully catch up to those who start in permanent jobs.

Suggested Citation

Booth, Alison L. and Francesconi, Marco and Frank, Jeff, Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones or Dead Ends?. Economic Journal, Vol. 112, pp. F189-F213, 2002. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=316900

Alison L. Booth (Contact Author)

Australian National University (ANU) - Research School of Social Sciences (RSSS) ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200
Australia
+61 2 6125 3285 (Phone)
+61 2 6125 0182 (Fax)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Marco Francesconi

University of Essex ( email )

Wivenhoe Park
Colchester CO4 3SQ
United Kingdom
+44 1206 873 534 (Phone)
+44 1206 873 151 (Fax)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Jeff Frank

University of London, Royal Holloway College - Department of Economics ( email )

Royal Holloway College
Egham
Surrey, Surrey TW20 0EX
United Kingdom
+44 20 8265 4203 (Phone)

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