How War Makes (and Unmakes) the Democratic State: Reading the Reluctant Fundamentalist and Exit West in a Populism Age

Forthcoming in War and Law in Literature (Alison LaCroix et al., eds.) (Oxford University Press, 2019)

U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 675

15 Pages Posted: 7 May 2018 Last revised: 15 May 2018

See all articles by Aziz Z. Huq

Aziz Z. Huq

University of Chicago - Law School

Date Written: April 27, 2018

Abstract

War makes the state, and war makes the state democratic—or so the conventional wisdom holds. But the wars of the twenty-first century will have a distinct complexion from wars of the century just passed. As war and democracy alike change, their relationship alters. This book chapter examines that relationship through the lens of two recent novels by Mohsin Hamid, The Reluctant Fundamentalist and Exit West. The protagonists of these novels stand in some fashion for the two main vectors by which war is perceived to, and indeed does, work a change to the democratic state—the terrorist and the migrant. The chapter explores how the role these figures play in the modern democratic imaginary, and how Hamid’s novels subvert and challenge that role.

Suggested Citation

Huq, Aziz Z., How War Makes (and Unmakes) the Democratic State: Reading the Reluctant Fundamentalist and Exit West in a Populism Age (April 27, 2018). Forthcoming in War and Law in Literature (Alison LaCroix et al., eds.) (Oxford University Press, 2019); U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 675. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3169876

Aziz Z. Huq (Contact Author)

University of Chicago - Law School ( email )

1111 E. 60th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
109
Abstract Views
406
rank
252,230
PlumX Metrics