From ‘Hard Rock Hallelujah’ to ‘Ukonhauta’ in Nokialand: A Socionomic Perspective on the Mood Shift in Finland's Popular Music from 2006 to 2009

Popular Music, 2016

17 Pages Posted: 11 Jun 2018

See all articles by Mikko Ketovuori

Mikko Ketovuori

University of Turku

Matt Lampert

Socionomics Institute

Date Written: December 31, 2016

Abstract

Social mood in Finland shifted from generally positive in the spring of 2006 to generally negative by the spring of 2009. We identify this change in mood via eight indicators, including the onset of a financial and macroeconomic crisis, a decline in measures of sentiment, a rise in radical politics and the demise of an iconic business unit of one of the country’s most successful firms. From the point of view of Prechter’s socionomic theory we hypothesize that this change in social mood is also evident in a greater level of pessimism in the songs on the country’s pop chart in 2009 relative to 2006. To test this hypothesis, we introduce and validate a tool to measure optimism and pessimism in popular music. We apply this tool to a random sample of songs from the Finnish pop chart from 2006 and a comparable sample from 2009. Indeed, we find that the sample from 2009 in the aggregate is substantially and significantly more pessimistic than the sample from 2006. The study serves to enrich our understanding of what makes pop songs popular and how popular music is linked psychologically to broader popular culture and other domains of social expression through a shared social mood.

Keywords: socionomic theory, socionomics, financial markets, popular culture, popular music, Finland, stock market, behavioral finance, social mood

JEL Classification: E71, G15, N24

Suggested Citation

Ketovuori, Mikko and Lampert, Matt, From ‘Hard Rock Hallelujah’ to ‘Ukonhauta’ in Nokialand: A Socionomic Perspective on the Mood Shift in Finland's Popular Music from 2006 to 2009 (December 31, 2016). Popular Music, 2016, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3174754

Mikko Ketovuori

University of Turku ( email )

Turku, 20014
Finland

Matt Lampert (Contact Author)

Socionomics Institute ( email )

PO Box 1618
Gainesville, GA 30503
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.socionomics.net

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
81
Abstract Views
566
rank
329,315
PlumX Metrics